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See William Clark Green Bring Circus to Life in ‘Ringling Road’ Video

August 28th, 2015 · Guitar

Ringling Road” — a twisted tale of circus freaks and vice from sharp-tongued country-rocker William Clark Green — comes to life word-for-word in its eerie, coulrophobic new video.

“We wanted to hit a couple of levels,” Green says. “We wanted it creepy, but also just dark. The whole idea of the song is what goes on at a circus or a carnival after everyone leaves, and what happens is basically everyone gets pretty fucked up.”

Green has struck a chord with fans in the Lone Star State with three Texas Radio Number Ones (“She Likes the Beatles,” “Hanging Around” and “Sympathy”), but with “Ringling Road” — his first music video and the title track of his third album — he imagines a surreal patch of Texas most people would never dream of.

Featuring a muddy, twangy groove that’s always a bit unsettled, a carnival barker’s chorus and a recklessly drunken sing-along, Green wrote the song with Randall Clay and Ross Cooper about a bare stretch of dirt in Eastland, Texas. According to local stories, Ringling Brothers bought hundreds of acres of land there in the 1920s intending to build an amusement park. But after the park plans fell through, the company continued to use the land as a rest stop for circus trains, setting the stage for rowdy, surreal situations like those in Green’s story.

Full of vibrant debauchery and kooky characters, Green says the video shoot almost turned in to the story it was trying to tell. “I got to drink beer in a goofy costume for about ten hours,” he laughs. “The big deal was the monkey, we had to have a monkey. Her name was Tara and she was actually in Pirates of the Caribbean.”

With Green playing the part of a suspiciously-sketchy ring master, the video follows a Dick Tracy-esque murder-mystery plot complete with a dead clown, befuddled police detective and never-ending cast of possible suspects — like the beer-chugging bearded lady and coked-up trapeze artists, played by Green’s band members. Green tries to persuade the detective there’s nothing to see — a tattooed man kissing a snake lady or a drunken clown throwing shoes at a bear are perfectly normal, after all — but soon the story takes an even darker turn.

For Green, though, the real fear had to do with his first experience in front of a camera. “I was so scared,” he admits. “We make fun of each other in the band pretty bad, and I was afraid I was gonna do something so ridiculous that I was gonna have to hear about it for a year or two.”

Green’s third album, Ringling Road, rose to Number 18 on Billboard‘s country albums chart after being released in April, and he’s currently touring across Texas, Arkansas, Oklahoma, Nebraska and Kansas, with dates scheduled through December 1st.

Article source: http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/see-william-clark-green-bring-circus-to-life-in-ringling-road-video-20150828?utm_source=yahoomusic&utm_medium=referral?utm_source=yahoomusic&utm_medium=referral

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Maddie & Tae on ‘Start Here’ Album: ‘It’s Not Just Love, Boys and Rainbows’

August 28th, 2015 · Guitar

When Rolling Stone Country first encountered Maddie Tae, they were a teenaged duo, so new to the spotlight that they hadn’t quite worked out the elegant dance of taking turns responding to interviewers’ questions. They’d only just released their clever, catchy inversion of a certain bro-country template, “Girl in a Country Song,”and were watching it begin to register at radio and ripple through the media — even the outlets that don’t typically give country music the time of day.

Just over a year later, Maddie Marlow and Tae Dye are old pros, dispensing familiar hugs and holding court at an intimate tea-and-cookies gathering of press types in the loft of a rustic-chic event space in Nashville. They have a Number One hit under their belts, a second single making its climb up the charts and an album, Start Here (out today on Dot Records), that veers from topical sass, instead painting a picture of powerfully confessional, youthful, feminine solidarity.

It’s no longer accurate to call them teens now that Marlow is 20 and Dye turns that same age next month. When the singing and songwriting partners sit down with Rolling Stone Country for a two-on-one interview, Marlow impishly suggests a new solution: “They can call us ‘the twenties duo.’”

When Kelsea Ballerini had her recent chart-topper, people talked about her ending the drought of hit debut singles by female artists. But if you broaden the category beyond solo acts, then you two got there first.
Maddie Marlow: Sometimes people don’t really consider us.

Tae Dye: Yeah, they just disregard that. I do understand that they’re thinking solo female. But we’re like, “Hey! We did it too!”

Marlow: We were so happy for Kelsea, because she’s one of our really good friends. Really hardworking, too. So that was cool to see.

We even love all the guys that we poked fun at in “Girl in a Country Song.” But there’s just been such a lack of female perspective and female storytelling. So we’re just happy that the playing field’s a little more even now, and you’re getting the guy’s perspective and the girl’s perspective. It’s not just one-sided like it used to be.

In interviews, you’ve been asked to explain what you were trying to do with “Girl in a Country Song.” And you’ve spent a lot of time either reassuring or clarifying that you do, in fact, like the artists whose songs you’re calling out. Why was it so important to get that across?
Dye: There was a lot of explanation that came with introducing “Girl in a Country Song.” Because a lot of people, their first reaction was, “Oh, you hate these guys and you’re just dissing everybody.” That’s not what we were doing at all. Our intentions were just to write a song that we were feeling, and that’s always gonna be our intention with every song we write. . . We were just very annoyed at how ladies were being treated disrespected, [like] they had no value. But yeah, there was a lot of explaining to do with that, because people just thought we were being mean, and we weren’t.

Marlow: There was the big elephant in the room. The way these songs were talking to women or portraying them was so stereotypical and not realistic whatsoever. We just happened to call it out before anyone else did. I think people appreciated the honesty. We weren’t really trying to poke fun at the guys; we were more poking fun at the trend. Now that the song did do very well, I think it just goes to show that people wanted that message to be said.

Some critics seemed to have a hard time with the idea that you could criticize a trend without dismissing an entire genre of music.
Marlow: Yeah, it was so weird. They were like, “Oh, it’s girls against guys.” No, it’s not like that at all. It’s the story that’s been told over and over again, but from a different character. The character that doesn’t get to say anything finally spoke up.

Why did you decide to follow a song that was so pointed, witty and topical with a song that couldn’t be more different, the inspirational ballad “Fly”?
Marlow: “Fly” really is the polar opposite of “Girl in a Country Song.”

With our music, we don’t want to just do one thing. We want to show all these different sides of us and all the different influences that we have. “Girl in a Country Song,” musically, is probably the most out-there for us, because the rest of our record is very acoustic-driven, very organic. “Fly” is a better representation of us musically and lyrically. It was written when we were songwriters and really wanted our songs to be heard. For four years, nothing was happening for us. There’s a point where you’re going after something so wholeheartedly that you start getting discouraged when there’s no results or when no one’s taking interest.

Maddie and Tae
Maddie and Tae’s ‘Start Here’ album was released August 28th. John Shearer/Getty Images for Dot Records

To be fair, you were still very young.
Marlow: But no matter what age you are, when you’re that driven, when you’re that set on something, you are going after it no matter what. We really, really wanted to have these songs heard, and nothing was coming our way. We wrote “Fly” in such a vulnerable place where we weren’t sure if we had what it took or we would ever make it. Now to have that song on country radio and have our fans singing it back is just wild, because we remember that exact moment, feeling that way.

After you’d made such an impression with “Girl in a Country Song,” what kind of thought did you put into establishing your artistic identity with this album?
Dye: When picking songs for the album, we wanted to obviously cover a broad spectrum of everything that we’ve been going through for the past five years. We’ve lived a lot of life in the last five years. It’s not a lot a lot, but five years of going through school and dealing with bullies and going on awkward fishing dates.

Marlow: And growing up at 17-years-old.

Dye: And we wanted the instruments to reflect what we were saying. Because we grew up on traditional country music, and we wanted steel [guitar], we wanted fiddle, we wanted all those instruments that we loved listening to growing up.

On the very first track there’s a steel guitar solo from Paul Franklin.
[Unison] Yes!

Tell me more about how the feel of the album reflects the tastes you formed growing up in Texas and Oklahoma.
Marlow: That music has always evoked emotion. That steel guitar and that fiddle really complement [us] lyrically, whether it’s a fast song or a slow song. That’s really important to both of us to have that element. There’s a song called “Right Here Right Now” that’s probably the closest to a pop-country vibe, and there’s pedal steel all over that thing. [Our producer] Dann Huff, when we would call him — we were on the road when we were trying to finalize the tracks — we would say, “Turn up the steel.” He was like, “It’s gonna bleed into your vocal if it goes any louder.” And we were like, “But we want it to stand out!”

Dye: We did experiment, just because we wanted things to stay fun and stay modern, something that people would want to listen to today. But we never stray from who we are throughout this whole entire album.

“Shut Up and Fish” is another song that flips the script.
Marlow: Role reversal.

I could name you ten songs by male acts about people who are so citified they don’t know what to do with themselves in the country.
Dye: Brad Paisley’s “I’m Gonna Miss Her” for one.

So what made you want to take up that theme?
Dye: A real event that actually happened. We were 16. This was the first summer that we actually got to hang out a lot. One day we were just really bored: “We love to fish, so let’s go fishing.” We’d been texting these guys, “Do you want to go fishing with us?” We literally thought it was just fishing, because they had the fishing poles, which they didn’t even know how to use, come to find out. So we get there, and they come dressed up in like white v-necks and coral shorts. Just the typical city boy with their Sperry [boat shoes] and stuff. So we’re like, “You know we’re going fishing, right?”

Marlow: At a pond—not on a boat.

Dye: Oh, it was muddy. . . So we’re trying to fish, and Maddie and I take it very seriously because we wanna catch something. We didn’t just go there to mess around. We didn’t catch anything that day, because all the boys wanted to do was talk and bust a move. . . You’d better do some flirting with the fish so they’ll come and bite my hook.

You co-wrote that song in the middle of high school, and you’ve written the rest of these since. Do you feel that you’ve had to work harder to be taken seriously as singers and songwriters as such young women?
Marlow: Because of the lyrical content, people get completely caught off guard because they don’t expect that from two young girls. But I think when people hear our music, they then take us seriously. They’re like, “OK, they can actually write good music, and they’ve had a hand in everything they’re doing.” We’re very on top of everything in our career, between social media, the album artwork. Every single song, we wrote. [For the] live show, we put together our sets and figure out what songs we wanna cover. People see that we have a hand in every aspect, and then we’re taken seriously.

Dye: There’s a little bit of an advantage to being the underdog too, because you can kind of throw people off guard and come out of it on top.

In what ways would you say you sound your age?
Marlow: It’s funny because whenever you’re younger, if you’re singing songs about marriage and kids and stuff, it’s like, “That’s not believable, because you’re 19 years old. You haven’t gone through that.” So what we do is just write what we know. We write what we experience, and that’s how we sound our age. Sometimes with younger people they don’t expect maturity, but because we moved to Nashville on our own at 17 and tried to figure out how to pay bills, that was where that maturity came from. That helps us reach those broader audiences, because it’s not just love and boys and rainbows and that kind of stuff. It’s deeper and it’s meaningful, and that’s something that we try to thread through every single song that we write.

Article source: http://www.rollingstone.com/music/features/maddie-tae-on-start-here-album-its-not-just-love-boys-and-rainbows-20150828?utm_source=yahoomusic&utm_medium=referral?utm_source=yahoomusic&utm_medium=referral

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Hear Keith Richards’ Brash, Funky New Song ‘Substantial Damage’

August 28th, 2015 · Guitar

Keith Richards has unleashed “Substantial Damage,” a funk-inspired track from his upcoming solo LP, Crosseyed Heart.  

Related: Keith Richards: ‘I Want to See How Far the Stones Can Go’

“Substantial Damage” is a groove monster, defined by Richards’ brash guitar riffs and the propulsive drumming of co-writer/producer Steve Jordan. The track is the third sample thus far from Crosseyed Heart, following lead single “Trouble” and the recently unlocked “Amnesia.”

The song was part of an ongoing viral campaign, as fans unlocked the track on the guitarist’s website by tracking down passwords on plaques significant to the Rolling Stones member’s life.

The upcoming LP, out September 18th, is Richards’ third solo work and first since 1992′s Main Offender. The eclectic new album – which spans reggae (“Love Overdue”), rock (“Trouble”), country (“Robbed Blind”) and blues (“Blues in the Morning”) – finds Richards backed by X-Pensive Winos collaborators Jordan (drums) and Waddy Wachtel (guitars). Richards contributes vocals, guitars, piano and bass.

Crosseyed Heart also features several special guests, including Norah Jones (on ballad duet “Illusion”) and Aaron Neville (“Nothing on Me”). Two tracks, “Amnesia” and “Blues in the Morning,” include contributions from late Stones saxophonist Bobby Keys.

In April, Richards told Rolling Stone that a solo world tour is “being kicked around” but hasn’t been fully strategized. “At the moment, I’m just getting my head into the Stones, and I haven’t really thought about what I’m going to do afterwards,” he said. “But usually if I put a record out, I do some road work. So, it’s possible.” 

Last month, Richards held an intimate listening party for the LP at New York’s Electric Lady Studios, where a few dozen guests assembled to preview the material. 

Article source: http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/hear-keith-richards-brash-funky-new-song-substantial-damage-20150828?utm_source=yahoomusic&utm_medium=referral?utm_source=yahoomusic&utm_medium=referral

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Van Morrison Preps Expanded Reissues of ‘Astral Weeks,’ ‘His Band’

August 28th, 2015 · Guitar

Van Morrison’s seminal 1968 LP Astral Weeks and 1970′s His Band and the Street Choir, will be expanded, remastered and reissued on October 30th via Warner Bros.

Both LPs will be made available digitally and on CD, each featuring a handful of previously unreleased, alternate versions of album cuts.

The expanded Astral Weeks will include the first take of “Beside You,” a stripped down, vibraphone-heavy “Madame George” and longer versions of “Ballerina” and “Slim Slow Slider.” All offer a deeper examination of Morrison’s working relationship with the quartet that helped him record the LP: bassist Richard Davis, guitarist Jay Berliner, percussionist Warren Smith, Jr. and drummer Connie Kay.

His Band and The Street Choir, meanwhile, will include five unreleased bonus cuts, including the gritty third take of “Give Me A Kiss” without piano, horns or backing vocals. The tenth take of “Call Me Up In Dreamland” will also be included, as will take three of “Gypsy Queen” and a funky alternate version of “I’ve Been Working.” Complete track lists for both albums are available below.

Along with the new releases from Warner Bros., Legacy Recordings, the catalog division of Sony Music, is prepping their own massive Van Morrison reissue campaign after acquiring the rights to 50 albums, videos and compilations released over the past half-century. The label intends to put out deluxe editions of select records — starting with 1972′s Saint Dominic’s Preview, 1973′s Hard Nose the Highway, 1974′s It’s Too late to Stop Now and 1990′s Enlightenment — and eventually make the full catalog available digitally.

Morrison himself has also been looking back through his discography, releasing a new album earlier this year called Duets: Re-Working the Catalogue that found him reimagining classic tracks with guests like Steve Winwood, Bobby Womack, Mavis Staples and Taj Mahal. Recording that album, Morrison told Rolling Stone, made him realize just how many songs he’d cut, estimating the total number was between 350 and 400.

“The work was created for survival reasons,” he said. “I had to make two albums a year for Warner Bros. I was churning out songs, and not every song got on an album…. I didn’t know I was going to have this body of work.”

Astral Weeks Expanded Edition Track List

1. “Astral Weeks”
2. “Beside You”
3. “Sweet Thing”
4. “Cyprus Avenue”
5. “The Way Young Lovers Do”
6. “Madame George”
7. “Ballerina”
8. “Slim Slow Slider”
9. “Beside You” (Take 1)
10. “Madame George” (Take 4)
11. “Ballerina” (Long Version)
12. “Slim Slow Slider” (Long Version)

His Band and The Street Choir Expanded Edition Track List

1. “Domino”
2. “Crazy Face”
3. “Give Me A Kiss”
4. “I’ve Been Working”
5. “Call Me Up In Dreamland”
6. “I’ll Be Your Lover, Too”
7. “Blue Money”
8. “Virgo Clowns”
9. “Gypsy Queen”
10. “Sweet Jannie”
11. “If I Ever Needed Someone”
12. “Street Choir”
13. “Call Me Up In Dreamland” (Take 10)
14. “Give Me A Kiss” (Take 3)
15. “Gypsy Queen” (Take 3)
16. “I’ve Been Working” (Alternate Version)
17. “I’ll Be Your Lover, Too” (Alternate Version)

Article source: http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/van-morrison-preps-expanded-reissues-of-astral-weeks-his-band-20150827?utm_source=yahoomusic&utm_medium=referral?utm_source=yahoomusic&utm_medium=referral

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Hear Alabama, Alison Krauss Duet on Romantic ‘Come Find Me’

August 28th, 2015 · Guitar

Alabama’s repertoire has always been a solid blend of foot-stomping anthems and tender ballads, and the tradition continues on Southern Drawl, the first album of original songs from the trio of Randy Owen, Teddy Gentry and Jeff Cook since 2001. One of the many highlights on the collection is “Come Find Me,” a road weary musician’s message to the object of his affection.

Owen’s lead vocal conveys the ache of separation, but there’s also a playful edge. “There’s a line that says, ‘Every now and then, I get to rolling and the wheels come loose. I’m rocking like a rock star dude out here in the crazy.’ We’ve lived that one. Are you kidding?” Owen says with a laugh.

“Come Find Me” was one of the last two songs the iconic group found for the album. Gentry recalls Owen pulling up in his pickup truck and excitedly reporting that he had two strong contenders for the project. He then played “Wasn’t Through Loving You Yet,” which became the first single, and “Come Find Me.” “I thought it was a really cool song about being out on the road away from the one you love,” says Gentry, who then invited Alison Krauss to sing harmony and play fiddle on the track. “It’s a really special song. I’m so happy with the way it turned out.”

But perhaps the song’s biggest fan is Owen’s wife, Kelly — a tough critic (according to her husband) who’d recently told him she was “losing faith in country music.” Hearing “Come Find Me” had her singing a different tune.

“She said, ‘When somebody comes along and writes a song like that, it brings me back in again.’ That’s about as strong, for me, as it can get as far as a compliment about a song,” Owen says. “Then the next morning she made my coffee and we always write little notes to one another. She wrote some little things I can’t say and then she wrote, ‘Come find me.’ So I was like, ‘OK, she loves it!’ The greatest critic in the world can also give you the most pleasure when she tells you she’s crazy about a song. She’s lived that one.”

Alabama’s Southern Drawl album will be released September 18th.

Article source: http://www.rollingstone.com/music/premieres/hear-alabama-alison-krauss-duet-on-romantic-come-find-me-20150827?utm_source=yahoomusic&utm_medium=referral?utm_source=yahoomusic&utm_medium=referral

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Flashback: Guns N’ Roses Play Final Show Before Mysterious Hiatus

August 28th, 2015 · Guitar

Slash caused a huge stir this past weekend when he didn’t challenge a Swedish reporter’s assertion that he was back on speaking terms with Axl Rose. “It was probably way overdue, you know,” he said. “But it’s very cool at this point to dispel some of that negative stuff that was going on for so long.” He never actually said, “Axl and I are talking again,” and it’s quite possible he was merely saying that his own negative feelings have dissipated in recent years, but the remark was more than enough to generate headlines all over the world.

One reason the comments got the Guns N’ Roses fan community so excited is that they came not long after word arrived that guitarists DJ Ashba and Ron “Bumblefoot” Thal had left the group. Throw in the fact that original bassist Duff McKagan filled in for Tommy Stinson on a South American tour last year, and it’s hard to not think that maybe something is indeed coming together. A reunion tour would generate unimaginable amounts of money, possibly enough for Axl to get over his negative feelings towards Slash. Also, it’s been nearly a week, and nobody in the band has uttered a word of denial.

As we wait to see what happens, here’s a look back to Guns N’ Roses playing “Welcome to the Jungle” and “It’s So Easy” at the group’s last gig with DJ Ashba and Bumblefoot. It was held June 7th, 2014, at the Joint in Las Vegas. Axl has been extremely quiet in the nearly 15 months since that night. Has he spent that time reconciling with Slash and preparing one of the biggest reunion tours in history? Has he simply made enough money from touring with Guns N’ Roses over the past few years that he can afford to leave the spotlight and live his life in peace and solitude? We have absolutely no idea, but let’s all hope that Axl somehow found it in his heart to overlook whatever he believes Slash did back in the 1990s and they are indeed friends again. We’ve had the new Guns N’ Roses for quite a few years now. We’re ready for the old one to come back.

Article source: http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/flashback-guns-n-roses-play-final-show-before-mysterious-hiatus-20150827?utm_source=yahoomusic&utm_medium=referral?utm_source=yahoomusic&utm_medium=referral

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Patti Smith Leads Powerful ‘Horses’ Set in Jimi Hendrix’s Studio

August 27th, 2015 · Guitar

As part of a performance of her debut album Horses in the studio where she recorded it, Patti Smith sang her beatific cover of Them’s “Gloria” twice. The first time was as the set opener, in which she transitioned from reading the poem off an LP copy of the record into the full-on punk explosion that was the album’s only single. The small audience was rapt. But it was the second time – deep into the record’s three-movement penultimate track “Land” – when it became transcendent: Smith stepped off the small stage, onto a couch and shoved the mic into the face of a fan to sing “Gloooriaaa” euphorically before hugging him. The fan was Michael Stipe.

The former R.E.M. frontman was one of only a hundred or so fans invited to Wednesday’s concert, a celebration of New York City’s Electric Lady Studio, which Jimi Hendrix had opened 45 years ago to the day. Although the “Purple Haze” singer spent only about a month recording in the studio before his death, the room has gone on to welcome Kiss, U2 and Daft Punk, among many others over the years. And it’s in the Greenwich Village building’s Studio B where Smith and her Group recorded the monumental punk blueprint Horses with John Cale in September 1975.

Four decades later, Smith and guitarist Lenny Kaye both sport long, gray hair but otherwise had a sprightly energy about them onstage in Electric Lady’s Studio A that suggested they felt no different than when they were in the building originally. The 68-year-old singer, who wore an Electric Lady T-shirt under her signature black vest and jacket, sounded almost invariably the same as she did on the record, howling its highs and carefully enunciating words during its more poetic, “Jesus died for somebody’s sins but not mine” moments. She also spit on the stage several times throughout the set as if it were CBGB.

The room itself was dimly lit and the stage was set up in front of a glass wall separating it from the mixing booth – drummer Jay Dee Daugherty played in an isolation booth on stage left – and Smith’s copy of Horses, a poetry book and some of her lyrics were leaning against the glass. A mix of fans and music industry types, who generally skewed toward the younger side, as well as a few artists and celebrities, including Stipe, Liv Tyler, Dakota Johnson and Arcade Fire’s Win Butler filed in as the group took the stage around 8:30.

For a little over an hour, Smith and her bandmates – who have already been performing Horses live around the world in celebration of its 40th anniversary – triumphantly revisited its eight tracks and extending them to make for rousing jams. In the break between “Free Money” and “Kimberly,” she joked that it was time to turn the record over to side B. And she had fun with the audience, telling a woman up front that she was allowed to put her pocketbook by the stage and joking that she was an interior designer. “If anybody’s uncomfortable or wants to sit down, it’s OK, I’ll make you get up later,” she told the audience, which laughed in response.

She also told stories about some of the songs, recalling writing “Break It Up” with Tom Verlaine in 1974 in memory of Jim Morrison. The song “came from a dream I had that I went into a field and there was this marble, stone statue lying prone in chains, sort of like Prometheus but with the wings of an angel,” she said. “In the dream, I knew that it was Jim Morrison and that he was trapped in his own skin, which was the marble, and I kept saying, ‘Break it up, Jim,’ and finally the marble cracked and the angel flew away, and that’s what this song is about.” She also told a story about how she was blown away when she heard thousands of people in Poland sing its gang chorus with her in concert. “You can’t imagine what it’s like to hear 20,000 strangers in a little field in a village somewhere near Krakow, people you don’t know, you never saw before, heartfully singing along with you,” she said. “It was almost like being at an R.E.M. concert.” Stipe laughed as she went on to describe her first time seeing his band, and how she was impressed by seeing everyone sing along to “Man in the Moon” and how good she felt when it happened to her with “Break It Up.”

“Tonight, it’s a night to party,” Smith raved.

After that rousing song, on which the small audience joined her like the people she described in Poland, she got ready to perform “Land,” by reading her own “Land (Version)” poem from her book Early Work, 1970 – 1979. By the time the punkish beat kicked in and she was singing the words “Horses, horses, horses, horses,” she was punching the air, telling the audience to raise their hands. She also changed the narrative of the song to have its main character, “Johnny,” stop by Electric Lady for the studio’s 45th anniversary. “Tonight, it’s a night to party,” she raved. “People are having a good time at Electric Ladyland.” By the end, she felt overcome enough to approach Stipe for their glorious “Gloria” moment. By the time she’d worked her way back to the stage for the album’s final number, he was just holding his hand against his chest, emotional.

She ended the set the same way she did the album, with “Elegie,” a song she said she’d written with Blue Öyster Cult’s Allen Lanier in memory of Hendrix. “A lot has happened in 40 years and all of us have lost people that we love… obviously we can’t name them all, but this little song, written for Jimi Hendrix, now becomes a song to honor and remember all of them,” she said. As the tune’s plaintive, moving guitar line howled, Smith sang its lyrics about how “memory falls like cream in my bones.” She ended it by chanting a list of names of people she missed: Hendrix, Jim Morrison, Brian Jones, Janis Joplin, the original Ramones, Joe Strummer, Robert Quine, Hilly Kristal, Lizzy Mercier, Jim Carroll, Allen Lanier, Robert Mapplethorpe, Kurt Cobain, Amy Winehouse, her brother Todd,  her husband Fred, Ornette Coleman, Lou Reed. When she was done, she simply said, “Horses,” the band got onstage and they bowed in unison. “Happy anniversary, Jimi,” she said.

Set List:

“Gloria”
“Redondo Beach”
“Birdland”
“Free Money”
“Kimberly”
“Break It Up”
“Land”
“Elegie”

Article source: http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/patti-smith-leads-powerful-horses-set-in-jimi-hendrixs-studio-20150827?utm_source=yahoomusic&utm_medium=referral?utm_source=yahoomusic&utm_medium=referral

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Patti Smith Leads Powerful ‘Horses’ Set in Jimi Hendrix’s Studio

August 27th, 2015 · Guitar

As part of a performance of her debut album Horses in the studio where she recorded it, Patti Smith sang her beatific cover of Them’s “Gloria” twice. The first time was as the set opener, in which she transitioned from reading the poem off an LP copy of the record into the full-on punk explosion that was the album’s only single. The small audience was rapt. But it was the second time – deep into the record’s three-movement penultimate track “Land” – when it became transcendent: Smith stepped off the small stage, onto a couch and shoved the mic into the face of a fan to sing “Gloooriaaa” euphorically before hugging him. The fan was Michael Stipe.

The former R.E.M. frontman was one of only a hundred or so fans invited to Wednesday’s concert, a celebration of New York City’s Electric Lady Studio, which Jimi Hendrix had opened 45 years ago to the day. Although the “Purple Haze” singer spent only about a month recording in the studio before his death, the room has gone on to welcome Kiss, U2 and Daft Punk, among many others over the years. And it’s in the Greenwich Village building’s Studio B where Smith and her Group recorded the monumental punk blueprint Horses with John Cale in September 1975.

Four decades later, Smith and guitarist Lenny Kaye both sport long, gray hair but otherwise had a sprightly energy about them onstage in Electric Lady’s Studio A that suggested they felt no different than when they were in the building originally. The 68-year-old singer, who wore an Electric Lady T-shirt under her signature black vest and jacket, sounded almost invariably the same as she did on the record, howling its highs and carefully enunciating words during its more poetic, “Jesus died for somebody’s sins but not mine” moments. She also spit on the stage several times throughout the set as if it were CBGB.

The room itself was dimly lit and the stage was set up in front of a glass wall separating it from the mixing booth – drummer Jay Dee Daugherty played in an isolation booth on stage left – and Smith’s copy of Horses, a poetry book and some of her lyrics were leaning against the glass. A mix of fans and music industry types, who generally skewed toward the younger side, as well as a few artists and celebrities, including Stipe, Liv Tyler, Dakota Johnson and Arcade Fire’s Win Butler filed in as the group took the stage around 8:30.

For a little over an hour, Smith and her bandmates – who have already been performing Horses live around the world in celebration of its 40th anniversary – triumphantly revisited its eight tracks and extending them to make for rousing jams. In the break between “Free Money” and “Kimberly,” she joked that it was time to turn the record over to side B. And she had fun with the audience, telling a woman up front that she was allowed to put her pocketbook by the stage and joking that she was an interior designer. “If anybody’s uncomfortable or wants to sit down, it’s OK, I’ll make you get up later,” she told the audience, which laughed in response.

She also told stories about some of the songs, recalling writing “Break It Up” with Tom Verlaine in 1974 in memory of Jim Morrison. The song “came from a dream I had that I went into a field and there was this marble, stone statue lying prone in chains, sort of like Prometheus but with the wings of an angel,” she said. “In the dream, I knew that it was Jim Morrison and that he was trapped in his own skin, which was the marble, and I kept saying, ‘Break it up, Jim,’ and finally the marble cracked and the angel flew away, and that’s what this song is about.” She also told a story about how she was blown away when she heard thousands of people in Poland sing its gang chorus with her in concert. “You can’t imagine what it’s like to hear 20,000 strangers in a little field in a village somewhere near Krakow, people you don’t know, you never saw before, heartfully singing along with you,” she said. “It was almost like being at an R.E.M. concert.” Stipe laughed as she went on to describe her first time seeing his band, and how she was impressed by seeing everyone sing along to “Man in the Moon” and how good she felt when it happened to her with “Break It Up.”

“Tonight, it’s a night to party,” Smith raved.

After that rousing song, on which the small audience joined her like the people she described in Poland, she got ready to perform “Land,” by reading her own “Land (Version)” poem from her book Early Work, 1970 – 1979. By the time the punkish beat kicked in and she was singing the words “Horses, horses, horses, horses,” she was punching the air, telling the audience to raise their hands. She also changed the narrative of the song to have its main character, “Johnny,” stop by Electric Lady for the studio’s 45th anniversary. “Tonight, it’s a night to party,” she raved. “People are having a good time at Electric Ladyland.” By the end, she felt overcome enough to approach Stipe for their glorious “Gloria” moment. By the time she’d worked her way back to the stage for the album’s final number, he was just holding his hand against his chest, emotional.

She ended the set the same way she did the album, with “Elegie,” a song she said she’d written with Blue Öyster Cult’s Allen Lanier in memory of Hendrix. “A lot has happened in 40 years and all of us have lost people that we love… obviously we can’t name them all, but this little song, written for Jimi Hendrix, now becomes a song to honor and remember all of them,” she said. As the tune’s plaintive, moving guitar line howled, Smith sang its lyrics about how “memory falls like cream in my bones.” She ended it by chanting a list of names of people she missed: Hendrix, Jim Morrison, Brian Jones, Janis Joplin, the original Ramones, Joe Strummer, Robert Quine, Hilly Kristal, Lizzy Mercier, Jim Carroll, Allen Lanier, Robert Mapplethorpe, Kurt Cobain, Amy Winehouse, her brother Todd,  her husband Fred, Ornette Coleman, Lou Reed. When she was done, she simply said, “Horses,” the band got onstage and they bowed in unison. “Happy anniversary, Jimi,” she said.

Set List:

“Gloria”
“Redondo Beach”
“Birdland”
“Free Money”
“Kimberly”
“Break It Up”
“Land”
“Elegie”

Article source: http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/patti-smith-leads-powerful-horses-set-in-jimi-hendrixs-studio-20150827?utm_source=yahoomusic&utm_medium=referral?utm_source=yahoomusic&utm_medium=referral

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Patti Smith Leads Powerful ‘Horses’ Set in Jimi Hendrix’s Studio

August 27th, 2015 · Guitar

As part of a performance of her debut album Horses in the studio where she recorded it, Patti Smith sang her beatific cover of Them’s “Gloria” twice. The first time was as the set opener, in which she transitioned from reading the poem off an LP copy of the record into the full-on punk explosion that was the album’s only single. The small audience was rapt. But it was the second time – deep into the record’s three-movement penultimate track “Land” – when it became transcendent: Smith stepped off the small stage, onto a couch and shoved the mic into the face of a fan to sing “Gloooriaaa” euphorically before hugging him. The fan was Michael Stipe.

The former R.E.M. frontman was one of only a hundred or so fans invited to Wednesday’s concert, a celebration of New York City’s Electric Lady Studio, which Jimi Hendrix had opened 45 years ago to the day. Although the “Purple Haze” singer spent only about a month recording in the studio before his death, the room has gone on to welcome Kiss, U2 and Daft Punk, among many others over the years. And it’s in the Greenwich Village building’s Studio B where Smith and her Group recorded the monumental punk blueprint Horses with John Cale in September 1975.

Four decades later, Smith and guitarist Lenny Kaye both sport long, gray hair but otherwise had a sprightly energy about them onstage in Electric Lady’s Studio A that suggested they felt no different than when they were in the building originally. The 68-year-old singer, who wore an Electric Lady T-shirt under her signature black vest and jacket, sounded almost invariably the same as she did on the record, howling its highs and carefully enunciating words during its more poetic, “Jesus died for somebody’s sins but not mine” moments. She also spit on the stage several times throughout the set as if it were CBGB.

The room itself was dimly lit and the stage was set up in front of a glass wall separating it from the mixing booth – drummer Jay Dee Daugherty played in an isolation booth on stage left – and Smith’s copy of Horses, a poetry book and some of her lyrics were leaning against the glass. A mix of fans and music industry types, who generally skewed toward the younger side, as well as a few artists and celebrities, including Stipe, Liv Tyler, Dakota Johnson and Arcade Fire’s Win Butler filed in as the group took the stage around 8:30.

For a little over an hour, Smith and her bandmates – who have already been performing Horses live around the world in celebration of its 40th anniversary – triumphantly revisited its eight tracks and extending them to make for rousing jams. In the break between “Free Money” and “Kimberly,” she joked that it was time to turn the record over to side B. And she had fun with the audience, telling a woman up front that she was allowed to put her pocketbook by the stage and joking that she was an interior designer. “If anybody’s uncomfortable or wants to sit down, it’s OK, I’ll make you get up later,” she told the audience, which laughed in response.

She also told stories about some of the songs, recalling writing “Break It Up” with Tom Verlaine in 1974 in memory of Jim Morrison. The song “came from a dream I had that I went into a field and there was this marble, stone statue lying prone in chains, sort of like Prometheus but with the wings of an angel,” she said. “In the dream, I knew that it was Jim Morrison and that he was trapped in his own skin, which was the marble, and I kept saying, ‘Break it up, Jim,’ and finally the marble cracked and the angel flew away, and that’s what this song is about.” She also told a story about how she was blown away when she heard thousands of people in Poland sing its gang chorus with her in concert. “You can’t imagine what it’s like to hear 20,000 strangers in a little field in a village somewhere near Krakow, people you don’t know, you never saw before, heartfully singing along with you,” she said. “It was almost like being at an R.E.M. concert.” Stipe laughed as she went on to describe her first time seeing his band, and how she was impressed by seeing everyone sing along to “Man in the Moon” and how good she felt when it happened to her with “Break It Up.”

“Tonight, it’s a night to party,” Smith raved.

After that rousing song, on which the small audience joined her like the people she described in Poland, she got ready to perform “Land,” by reading her own “Land (Version)” poem from her book Early Work, 1970 – 1979. By the time the punkish beat kicked in and she was singing the words “Horses, horses, horses, horses,” she was punching the air, telling the audience to raise their hands. She also changed the narrative of the song to have its main character, “Johnny,” stop by Electric Lady for the studio’s 45th anniversary. “Tonight, it’s a night to party,” she raved. “People are having a good time at Electric Ladyland.” By the end, she felt overcome enough to approach Stipe for their glorious “Gloria” moment. By the time she’d worked her way back to the stage for the album’s final number, he was just holding his hand against his chest, emotional.

She ended the set the same way she did the album, with “Elegie,” a song she said she’d written with Blue Öyster Cult’s Allen Lanier in memory of Hendrix. “A lot has happened in 40 years and all of us have lost people that we love… obviously we can’t name them all, but this little song, written for Jimi Hendrix, now becomes a song to honor and remember all of them,” she said. As the tune’s plaintive, moving guitar line howled, Smith sang its lyrics about how “memory falls like cream in my bones.” She ended it by chanting a list of names of people she missed: Hendrix, Jim Morrison, Brian Jones, Janis Joplin, the original Ramones, Joe Strummer, Robert Quine, Hilly Kristal, Lizzy Mercier, Jim Carroll, Allen Lanier, Robert Mapplethorpe, Kurt Cobain, Amy Winehouse, her brother Todd,  her husband Fred, Ornette Coleman, Lou Reed. When she was done, she simply said, “Horses,” the band got onstage and they bowed in unison. “Happy anniversary, Jimi,” she said.

Set List:

“Gloria”
“Redondo Beach”
“Birdland”
“Free Money”
“Kimberly”
“Break It Up”
“Land”
“Elegie”

Article source: http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/patti-smith-leads-powerful-horses-set-in-jimi-hendrixs-studio-20150827?utm_source=yahoomusic&utm_medium=referral?utm_source=yahoomusic&utm_medium=referral

→ No CommentsTags: ··········

Patti Smith Leads Powerful ‘Horses’ Set in Jimi Hendrix’s Studio

August 27th, 2015 · Guitar

As part of a performance of her debut album Horses in the studio where she recorded it, Patti Smith sang her beatific cover of Them’s “Gloria” twice. The first time was as the set opener, in which she transitioned from reading the poem off an LP copy of the record into the full-on punk explosion that was the album’s only single. The small audience was rapt. But it was the second time – deep into the record’s three-movement penultimate track “Land” – when it became transcendent: Smith stepped off the small stage, onto a couch and shoved the mic into the face of a fan to sing “Gloooriaaa” euphorically before hugging him. The fan was Michael Stipe.

The former R.E.M. frontman was one of only a hundred or so fans invited to Wednesday’s concert, a celebration of New York City’s Electric Lady Studio, which Jimi Hendrix had opened 45 years ago to the day. Although the “Purple Haze” singer spent only about a month recording in the studio before his death, the room has gone on to welcome Kiss, U2 and Daft Punk, among many others over the years. And it’s in the Greenwich Village building’s Studio B where Smith and her Group recorded the monumental punk blueprint Horses with John Cale in September 1975.

Four decades later, Smith and guitarist Lenny Kaye both sport long, gray hair but otherwise had a sprightly energy about them onstage in Electric Lady’s Studio A that suggested they felt no different than when they were in the building originally. The 68-year-old singer, who wore an Electric Lady T-shirt under her signature black vest and jacket, sounded almost invariably the same as she did on the record, howling its highs and carefully enunciating words during its more poetic, “Jesus died for somebody’s sins but not mine” moments. She also spit on the stage several times throughout the set as if it were CBGB.

The room itself was dimly lit and the stage was set up in front of a glass wall separating it from the mixing booth – drummer Jay Dee Daugherty played in an isolation booth on stage left – and Smith’s copy of Horses, a poetry book and some of her lyrics were leaning against the glass. A mix of fans and music industry types, who generally skewed toward the younger side, as well as a few artists and celebrities, including Stipe, Liv Tyler, Dakota Johnson and Arcade Fire’s Win Butler filed in as the group took the stage around 8:30.

For a little over an hour, Smith and her bandmates – who have already been performing Horses live around the world in celebration of its 40th anniversary – triumphantly revisited its eight tracks and extending them to make for rousing jams. In the break between “Free Money” and “Kimberly,” she joked that it was time to turn the record over to side B. And she had fun with the audience, telling a woman up front that she was allowed to put her pocketbook by the stage and joking that she was an interior designer. “If anybody’s uncomfortable or wants to sit down, it’s OK, I’ll make you get up later,” she told the audience, which laughed in response.

She also told stories about some of the songs, recalling writing “Break It Up” with Tom Verlaine in 1974 in memory of Jim Morrison. The song “came from a dream I had that I went into a field and there was this marble, stone statue lying prone in chains, sort of like Prometheus but with the wings of an angel,” she said. “In the dream, I knew that it was Jim Morrison and that he was trapped in his own skin, which was the marble, and I kept saying, ‘Break it up, Jim,’ and finally the marble cracked and the angel flew away, and that’s what this song is about.” She also told a story about how she was blown away when she heard thousands of people in Poland sing its gang chorus with her in concert. “You can’t imagine what it’s like to hear 20,000 strangers in a little field in a village somewhere near Krakow, people you don’t know, you never saw before, heartfully singing along with you,” she said. “It was almost like being at an R.E.M. concert.” Stipe laughed as she went on to describe her first time seeing his band, and how she was impressed by seeing everyone sing along to “Man in the Moon” and how good she felt when it happened to her with “Break It Up.”

“Tonight, it’s a night to party,” Smith raved.

After that rousing song, on which the small audience joined her like the people she described in Poland, she got ready to perform “Land,” by reading her own “Land (Version)” poem from her book Early Work, 1970 – 1979. By the time the punkish beat kicked in and she was singing the words “Horses, horses, horses, horses,” she was punching the air, telling the audience to raise their hands. She also changed the narrative of the song to have its main character, “Johnny,” stop by Electric Lady for the studio’s 45th anniversary. “Tonight, it’s a night to party,” she raved. “People are having a good time at Electric Ladyland.” By the end, she felt overcome enough to approach Stipe for their glorious “Gloria” moment. By the time she’d worked her way back to the stage for the album’s final number, he was just holding his hand against his chest, emotional.

She ended the set the same way she did the album, with “Elegie,” a song she said she’d written with Blue Öyster Cult’s Allen Lanier in memory of Hendrix. “A lot has happened in 40 years and all of us have lost people that we love… obviously we can’t name them all, but this little song, written for Jimi Hendrix, now becomes a song to honor and remember all of them,” she said. As the tune’s plaintive, moving guitar line howled, Smith sang its lyrics about how “memory falls like cream in my bones.” She ended it by chanting a list of names of people she missed: Hendrix, Jim Morrison, Brian Jones, Janis Joplin, the original Ramones, Joe Strummer, Robert Quine, Hilly Kristal, Lizzy Mercier, Jim Carroll, Allen Lanier, Robert Mapplethorpe, Kurt Cobain, Amy Winehouse, her brother Todd,  her husband Fred, Ornette Coleman, Lou Reed. When she was done, she simply said, “Horses,” the band got onstage and they bowed in unison. “Happy anniversary, Jimi,” she said.

Set List:

“Gloria”
“Redondo Beach”
“Birdland”
“Free Money”
“Kimberly”
“Break It Up”
“Land”
“Elegie”

Article source: http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/patti-smith-leads-powerful-horses-set-in-jimi-hendrixs-studio-20150827?utm_source=yahoomusic&utm_medium=referral?utm_source=yahoomusic&utm_medium=referral

→ No CommentsTags: ··········